Notice

This multimedia story format uses video and audio footage. Please make sure your speakers are turned on.

Use the mouse wheel or the arrow keys on your keyboard to navigate between pages.

Swipe to navigate between pages.

Let's go

Danfoss on board fully electric workboat

Logo http://danfoss.pageflow.io/danfoss-drives-gmv-zero

North of NOx

This is one of the world's first fully electric work boats – designed and built by Grovfjord Mekaniske Verksted, Norway. No engine noise, no diesel fumes, zero emissions, exceptional maneuverability.  

It’s electrification at sea. And drives from Danfoss have helped make it happen.    
Goto first page

Arnold Hansen, inventor of Grovfjord Mekaniske Verksted's first electric workboat, took the role of skipper during one of the first sea-trials in late 2017. "Sailing silently in a boat this size is pure magic," he says.
Fullscreen
We are in Grovfjord – North of the Arctic Circle. Here, as in the rest of Norway’s fjords, salmon farming is a motor in the local economy. Locals have grown accustomed to eyeing the circular sea cages where the salmon are raised – just like people living in country farmland see barns or grain silos almost as part of the natural scenery.

But now something stands out – not so much to the eye as to the ear. It’s the new workboat used by the fish farming company, Northern Lights Salmon. The boat makes no sound when its crew take off in the morning to tend their salmon. All you hear, is the noise of the water hitting the bow.  

And this marks quite a difference compared to earlier when a loud knock echoed through the air as crew ignited the diesel engines. When they sailed off, there was also the traditional cluttering diesel-engine sound – almost as if an old truck was driving on the fjord.
Arnold Hansen, inventor of Grovfjord Mekaniske Verksted's first electric workboat, took the role of skipper during one of the first sea-trials in late 2017. "Sailing silently in a boat this size is pure magic," he says.
Close
Goto first page
The boat is named Astrid Helene. And it is silent because it has no diesel engines. It’s all electric. As a result, Northern Lights Salmon saves the atmosphere from roughly  90 ton of CO2 and 900 kg of NOx gases annually – the average emission of a diesel-powered fish farm workboat. 

Goto first page

Grovfjord Mekaniske Verksted delivered Astrid Helene to Northern Lights Salmon in early June 2018. Photo from the boat's first week at work.
Fullscreen
There are no longer any diesel fumes on deck either. For crew, the fumes could be quite annoying – particularly if the wind was blowing in the wrong direction. Now, there is just clean air.  

54-year-old Chairman of Northern Lights Salmon Søren Balteskard ­has known fish farming since the age of nine when his dad founded the family business. And according to him, fully electric work boats will play a key role in the industry’s future.  

“Electric boats are perfect for fish farming. The lack of engine noise is not only an advantage for the crew, but also for the salmon. It actually reduces stress levels in the fish. And the environmental benefits are obvious. This is key for us. Our aim has always been to run our business in as green a way as possible.”  

The disadvantages? According to Søren, there really aren’t any. Electric boats are easy to maneuver and go from zero to full speed extremely fast. And the typical concern about lack of charging possibilities during long-distance sailing is not a problem because fish farms are located close to shore.

“We can use Astrid Helene for a whole workday and still have about 45 percent power left when we return to shore. Charging is easy, too. We simply plug her to the grid overnight. And the next morning, she is fully charged – at only a fraction of what it costs to fill up the tank in one of our diesel boats.”  
Grovfjord Mekaniske Verksted delivered Astrid Helene to Northern Lights Salmon in early June 2018. Photo from the boat's first week at work.
Close
Goto first page
Grovfjord Mekaniske Verksted, which designed and built Astrid Helene, is Norway’s leading manufacturer of aluminum workboats. The company has delivered more than 115 boats to the fish farming industry over the last 15 years. Astrid Helene is their first fully electric one. But others will soon follow. The company already has orders for another handful in the books.

And the key components that have made this electric vision a reality? Let’s hear what they say inside the production halls where it all happens.
Goto first page

Astrid Helene is a 14-meter-long and 8-meter-wide aluminum catamaran workboat. Photo from the last part of the construction phase at Grovfjord Mekaniske Verksted.
Fullscreen
Astrid Helene is packed with heavy equipment, including a crane that can carry several tons and an electric winch to haul nets that can hold 12 tons of salmon. Still, it moves silently through the water at up to 10 knots, 18.5 km/h. 

Three types of components make it happen: A 4 m3 lithium-ion battery-pack, two electrical propulsion motors, and seven drives. The battery and the propulsion motors provide the muscle power. Between them sit the seven drives. They function as the nerves controlling the amount of electricity – or power – pulled out of the battery-pack and into the electric propulsion motors.

Anders Breines, Lead Electrical Engineer at Grovfjord Mekaniske Verksted, says:

“The drives are really key components. All electricity – every single kilowatt used on the boat – passes through them. And we are not only talking electricity for the propulsion motors, but for all electric equipment – all the way down to the coffee machine.”  
Astrid Helene is a 14-meter-long and 8-meter-wide aluminum catamaran workboat. Photo from the last part of the construction phase at Grovfjord Mekaniske Verksted.
Close
Goto first page

Electrification is the future. According to the International Energy Agency, for example, electricity use in buildings is expected to have nearly doubled by 2040. And roughly 90 percent of all cars worldwide will be plug-in electric by 2060. Trucks, off-highway vehicles and ships will also go electric.
Fullscreen
Drives from Danfoss help make the world greener. How? They control the speed of electric motors in applications ranging from factory production lines and supermarket refrigeration systems to containerships. Here, they cut down energy-use by making sure that the electric motors never run faster than necessary.

Electric motor systems are on the rise worldwide as fossil-fuel is on the way out. And electricity based on renewable energy resources such as solar, hydropower, and wind will play an increasingly dominant role and transform sectors such as cooling, heating, and transport.

Read more about Danfoss’ range of products and solutions that help this green transition become a reality.
Electrification is the future. According to the International Energy Agency, for example, electricity use in buildings is expected to have nearly doubled by 2040. And roughly 90 percent of all cars worldwide will be plug-in electric by 2060. Trucks, off-highway vehicles and ships will also go electric.
Close
Goto first page
At Danfoss, we are proud that the drives on board Astrid Helene bear our name. They are Danfoss Drives. We are also proud of the reason that Grovfjord Mekaniske Verksted chose us for the job. 

Anders Breines, Grovfjord Mekaniske Verksted:

“Drives from Danfoss perform very well. But so do the drives from the world’s other leading manufacturers. What clearly sets Danfoss apart is that they allow us to make changes to their software, so we can influence how the drives work and function on our boat. Most other companies lock their software and charge us extra, if we ask for changes. But the Danfoss guys show us how to use their software and how to make changes. They act as partners.”
Goto first page
Published by: Danfoss

Text & idea: Ole Kanstrup
Photos & video: Grovfjord Mekaniske Verksted
& Northern Lights Salmon.

Final video-editing: René V. Enghave

Further information at:
Grovfjord Mekaniske Verksted
Northern Lights Salmon
Danfoss

Goto first page
Scroll down to continue Swipe to continue
Swipe to continue